Top 5 Ducati Scrambler Custom Motorcycles

The Scrambler remixed, reworked, and re-scrambled.

Ducati Scrambler Custom
Your eyes deceive you. That is in fact a Scrambler.Photo: Fuel Bespoke Motorcycles

Yes, Ducati's "Land of Joy" marketing campaign, starring fist-bumping millennials engaging in slow-mo water fights and general co-ed tomfoolery, is all a bit obvious (you mean, if I ride a Scrambler I too can be an attractive slacker leading a life of fun and adventure? Sold!), but taken on its own, the Scrambler is an elemental bike with universal likeability. It also happens to be a great canvas for customization. From homages to classic Ducati models to anime-looking machines made from old oil drums, these customs kinda do take us to the "Land of Joy." Damn; marketing wins again.

Hondo Grattan by Deus Ex Machina

Ducati Scrambler Custom
This Ducati-commissioned Scrambler may be old news, but it’s still one of the more visionary builds we’ve seen.Photo: Ducati

At the Verona Motor Expo in 2015, Ducati unveiled three Scrambler customs it commissioned from noted builders, including this speedway-inspired bike from Filippo Bassoli of Deus Ex Machina Italy. It was unveiled shortly after the Scrambler debuted at Intermot in 2014, making it one of the first Scrambler customs ever, and still one of the coolest. Its asymmetrical front fender, one-piece tail section, yellow and blue paint scheme, and vintage lettering reinforce a look that makes it hard to place in a specific genre or time. Regardless, we’re pretty sure it would look best splattered in roost.

Ducati Scrambler Custom
Speedway-inspired number plate.Photo: Ducati
Ducati Scrambler Custom
Futuristic or retro? Whatever it is, it works.Photo: Ducati

Regolarita by XTR Pepo

Ducati Scrambler Custom
The Regolarita was commissioned by Ducati Spain.Photo: XTR Pepo

Pepo Rosell is well known for his many impressive Ducati customs from his first outfit, Radical Ducati. Since 2015, Rosell has been building bikes under the moniker XTR Pepo out of his shop in Madrid. The Regolarita mixes vintage and modern elements for a striking motorcycle that honors Ducati’s heritage and celebrates its modern vision (like the Scrambler itself). The donor bike was a 2016 Scrambler ICON that has been significantly modified and mated with vintage parts such as a seat from a 1970s OSSA dirtbike and a fuel tank from a 1962 Ducati 250 Diana.

Ducati Scrambler Custom
That fuel tank will make Ducatisti all warm and fuzzy. Note: modified swingarm from a Ducati Sport Classic.Photo: XTR Pepo
Ducati Scrambler Custom
Given the location of this photo shoot, it seems like no one told the photographer this is a scrambler, not a café racer. Since we’re here, how about some nice jamón and a glass of old vine Rioja?Photo: XTR Pepo

UMC-038 Hyper Scrambler by Untitled X Marin Speed Shop

Ducati Scrambler Custom
The frame and swingarm sport Ducati’s Rosso Corsa paint color, as used on the MotoGP bikes (and Superleggeras). The swingarm is from a Monster S2R. In addition to an Öhlins rear monoshock, it has Showa BPF forks from a GSX-R. A modified QD Ex-Box exhaust resides in a belly pan that adds a certain symmetry to the machine.Photo: RC Rivera Photography

As part of Ducati’s Custom Rumble competition, which challenged dealers world-wide to a Scrambler build-off, Marin Speed Shop, a dealer based in San Rafael, CA, enlisted the help of Untitled Motorcycles for a design that showcases the architectural beauty of the Scrambler’s trellis frame and V-twin motor. If Dwell did a motorcycling issue, this would be on the front cover. Its modern lines defy convention without challenging typical notions of beauty, which is no small accomplishment. Its beauty isn’t only skin deep; the modifications shaved 85 pounds from the stock machine.

Ducati Scrambler Custom
Birds-eye view shows how the tapered steel tank continues the character line through the seat.Photo: RC Rivera Photography
Ducati Scrambler Custom
Even though it’s a fairly extreme build, it still has a factory quality about it thanks to Untitled’s high standard of fit and finish. Check out the LED taillights and turns signals embedded in the rear frame.Photo: RC Rivera Photography

Flamingo by Vibrazioni Art Design

Ducati Scrambler Custom
Finally, an artful way to reuse industrial waste (receptacles).Photo: Vibrazioni Art Design

Alberto Dessasso and Ricardo Zanobini, the welding mask-wearing duo (and Daft Punk fans?) behind Vibrazioni Art Design use old industrial barrels to fashion furniture, motorcycles and more. The “Flamingo” features old Texaco barrels that have been beat into submission, forming origami-like tank and bodywork. The front of the bike features an oil cooler that incorporates the headlight for the ever-popular post apocalyptic look. Stock front suspension uses supplementary Bitubo shocks on custom supports, though it’s unclear what this accomplishes beyond the visual effect. Check out the beautiful welds on that exhaust system.

Ducati Scrambler Custom
OMG, it’s Daft Punk! Oh wait, it’s just Dessasso and Zanobini again.Photo: Vibrazioni Art Design
Ducati Scrambler Custom
Avoid crosswinds: stock rims feature bolt-on covers. The machine definitely makes a good conversation piece, though its shard-edged tank looks like a groin injury waiting to happen.Photo: Vibrazioni Art Design

Fuel Strada 800 by Fuel Bespoke Motorcycles

Ducati Scrambler Custom
Round headlight, café fairing: one of motorcycling’s great contributions to the world of design. Right up there with the headlights of an E-type Jaguar.Photo: Fuel Bespoke Motorcycles

Another build commissioned by Ducati Spain, the Strada 800 is a beautiful rendering of one of the most iconic Ducatis of all time: the original 900 Super Sport. If that black and gold livery doesn’t get you nostalgic for the golden era of ‘70s superbikes, nothing will. The fuel tank is actually from a Benelli Mojave, a small-displacement dirtbike marketed in the States through department stores. Obviously, it’s nowhere near a replica of the original, but it does look like a more literal interpretation of Ducati’s past than even the company’s own Sport Classic or MH900E.

Ducati Scrambler Custom
Timeless lines inspired by one of Ducati’s most timeless bikes.Photo: Fuel Bespoke Motorcycles
Ducati Scrambler Custom
Rearsets from a Monster, Rizoma clip-ons, and shortened front forks help achieve the appropriate stance.Photo: Fuel Bespoke Motorcycles

Which one would you like to take for a spin? Comment below.