Summer Has Come To Los Angeles

By Unknown Unknown

TUESDAY of last week was the warmest March 17 this city had had for 35 years, since 1879. The official temperature at noon was 93. Of course, natives and some who have not been east for years complained. Others remembered having read, just a day or so earlier, about the ice in the upper Mississippi, beginning to break up, and were happy. Since then they have read of more snow in the East. On the18th the first batch of so-called colonists arrived, and then the weather was fine again.

Los Angeles’ business center is in a valley in which some heat gathers and, with the products of burned gasoline and oil (scarcely any coal being used), produces something like the mugginess of eastern cities on occasional days. Not nearly as bad however, and when evening comes, with few exceptions, it is “so different.” For all that, a city is a city. Its air is not the country air. It is out where the orange blossoms are, northeast and east, or the many fragrances of the valley toward the sea, or up on the fresh, dry hilltops, or where the balmy odors of beautiful desert flowers are carried over the southwestern sandy hills to the ocean at night, that the charm of life in Los Angeles county gets in its soothing, yet tonic, work.

Everything is growing lushly hereabouts and the roads are alive with motorists.

Next Sunday the Los Angeles Motorcycle Club will have a picnic run, not more than about 15 miles as the bee flies, to the San Gabriel River. The start will be about 9 a.m. and everybody is invited. To take in one of these runs means to have a genuinely good time and, perhaps, to want to join the club. No force, nor even persuasion in so many words, is used upon club run guests. The present members get along like a big family, and their enjoyment is contagious.

On Sunday, March 15, the club held its much-discussed blind run. Just a little puncture in the tire of the captain pro tem delayed the start one hour. Then that official led the flock out to Redondo’t Clifton-by-the-sea, where Bob Burdette, the humorist-preacher, lives in summer-about 22 miles; then back to Inglewood, north to the Wilshire boulevard part of the Santa Monica road race course, and on to the La Brea oil well road (here’s where the Angelus Man, some 200,000 years old, was recently found), on to beautiful Hollywood; to Lankers him over well paved Cahuenga pass, where there was a stop to view an automobile that had turned flip-flops the night before; from Lankers him to Burbank where a man recently refused a million dollars for a thousand acres, and then a mile of sand. Business of staging a lot of fun, riders imitating breaking in of bronchos and so on. Then through San Fernando, 25 miles out of the city and on to Newhall, up the grade, through the tunnel, on to Saugus-on-the-endurance-route, and up to Soledad canyon. Some run. Some turns. The leaders dropped flour at every turn.

Eighty-seven miles of flour-chasing to the canyon. The lunches in Menegay’s little Hup were unlimbered and put below decks. It was warm in the canyon. At Newhall tunnel it was found to be a bit cooler-or a bit less warm. Pictures were taken. Then time dragged. Business of preparation for the home run. Intermission for a good ride. Then, at the club house-beans, tuna, ham, sauerkraut, sandwiches and coffee.

It had been a 125-mile run, with a wonderful mixture of roads and scenery. There were 25 machines, ten of them carrying tandem.

Last Friday the L. A. M. C. had its monthly ladies night. The secretary’s Invitation card said: “Don’t forget to bring your lady.” Few forgot, and an enjoyable time was had by all.

At last week’s meeting of the L. A.M.C., a letter was read from State Referee Lashlee, enclosing one from the Capital City M.C., of Sacramento, and it was agreed not to contest the Sacramento club’s desire have the 1914 championship events awarded for its coming race meet. What the Los Angeles M.C. is particularly interested in is the national meet for 1915. The Sacramento letter contained a claim that its club is the oldest in the state. The L. A. M. C. is F. A. M. club No. 8, and was organized in 1903, some time before it joined the F. A. M. Data about early F. A. M. clubs is now being sought from Secretary Gibson of the F. A. M. Data about early F. A. M. clubs of the F. A. M.

In connection with the 1915 F. A. M. convention matter may be mentioned the mile done in Exposition park track, right In Los Angeles. It is on high ground, has short straights and long turns, banked more than at Ascot park, and is very fast according to Glen Stokes, the well known racer, who states that on March 1 he won a five-mile match race there from Roy Shaw in 4:20, an average of :50 2-5 per mile, going the first mile in :48 3-5. Shaw won a three-mile match from Stokes at about the same average speed. The timing is said to have been unsatisfactory, the occasion was a mixed sport affair. Stokes’ stated time in winning a five-mile event form Shaw was given as 4:45, and that of’ Shaw, in beating Stokes in a three-mile match, as 2:23, the last mile in :45 3-5. Both used Excelsiors till Shaw’s machine went bad. His winning was on a Henderson

Another point to be borne in mind is that there will be many conventions, large and small, in California-many in San Francisco. next year, and that accommodations and the prices charged therefor, and the temptations connected there with, are likely to be inconvenient to the “consumer.” A railroad official says that more than 200 conventions have already been slated for San Francisco in 1915, and no doubt many of these, and more to come, will be held invitation card said :”Don’t forget to bring bunches. A crowd has its fascinations, but your “crowd” will be no name for conditions in 1915, and Los Angeles will be a busy town itself; yet in many ways it will be the logical place for the national motorcycle convention, followed by a scenic journey up the Coast to the big Bay City.

In connection with the 1915 F.A.M. convention matter may be mentioned that one-mile tract, right in Los Angeles. It is on high ground, has short straights and long turns, banked more than at Ascot park, and is very fast according to Glen Stokes, the well known racer, who states that on March 1 he won a five-mile match race there from Roy Show in 4:20, an average of :05 2-5 per mile, going the first mile in :48 3-5. Shaw won a three-mile match from Stokes at aout the same average speed. The occasion was a mixed sport affair.

By Unknown Unknown
Enjoyed this Post? Subscribe to our RSS Feed, or use your favorite social media to recommend us to friends and colleagues!

*Please enter your username

*Please enter your password

*Please enter your comments
Comments:
Not Registered?Signup Here
(1024 character limit)
Motorcyclist
  • Motorcyclist Online