Anti-Fog Products for Face Shield | Ride On, Adventurous One | Gear

Anti-Fog Products Tested

By Zack Courts, Photography by Joe Neric

EK Cat Crap Spray

With a name like this expectations were low, but EK USAs Cat Crap Spray (ewww) proved to be a good solution. (We sampled its Wax product also, but found the spray worked much better for motorcycle face shields). Simply spray the solution on and wipe it off with a soft cloth. Clarity after application was good, and though vision was slightly blurred when fogging began it did not become noticeably worse over the course of the 60-second stint. When the control side of the shield was completely fogged over the Cat Crap held its own. The product was under some duress but visibility was decidedly better on the treated side of the shield. The 1-ounce spray bottle isn't as convenient as an individually packaged wipe. Go to www.ekusa.com and pick up a bottle for $6.49.

Convenience
3.5 out of 5 stars
Clarity
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3.5 out of 5 stars


Zooke Z-WAX

Zooke produces both a spray and wax anti-fog solution. In this case, for reasons unknown to us, the Z-WAX performed noticeably better than the spray. No instructions were provided with our product, directions can be found on the company Web site. Clarity in dry conditions was acceptable, and the provided micro-fiber cloth gave us the confidence to buff out imperfections knowing we wouldn't damage the shield. The anti-fog abilities of Zooke Z-WAX were solid, though a little underpowered. The defogging was decent but not as thorough as would be needed on a very cool or damp night. The container holding 18 oz. of wax costs $11.95 (add $4.95 for the cloth) and will fit in even the smallest pocket. Order yours at www.alpinestars.com.

Convenience
3.5 out of 5 stars
Clarity
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2.5 out of 5 stars


Toothpaste

We tried toothpaste based on a moto-legend that its a backup anti-fog when you need it. Considering this product was made to keep teeth healthy, it performed impressively. Application is finger-lickin' good, but it takes diligence to make sure a uniform layer is left on the shield. Fogging occurred quickly, but while the treated side of the shield became blurry it did not fog up entirely. We gave it an extra star for convenience because its cheap and you're likely to have some around if you're on the road.

Convenience
4 out of 5 stars
Clarity
2.5 out of 5 stars
Performance
2.5 out of 5 stars


Speedo Anti-Fog Solution

Speedos anti-fog product is obviously not geared for motorcycling, but if a company is good enough for Michael Phelps we figure its worth a shot. The instructions call for the solution to be applied, rinsed, and left to dry, but we found that procedure left a thick and intrusive layer of product on the shield. However, once the fogging started it kept certain parts of the shield almost perfectly clear, while other sections fogged slightly. Disobeying the directions and buffing out the lumpy coating created a more consistent layer, but was still blurry to look through, and it only got worse when the fogging began. If we could figure out a way for the solution to be applied and be truly transparent, it might be the real deal. You can get a 2.5 oz. bottle for $13.99 at www.speedo.com.

Convenience
2.5 out of 5 stars
Clarity
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars

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