2014 BMW F800GS Adventure | First Look

By Marc Cook, Photography by BMW

BMW continues to strengthen its adventure-touring lineup with the addition of the 2014 BMW F800GS Adventure. Taking cues from the larger R1200GS-A, the new parallel-twin ADV machine aims to drive the platform further in the off-road direction. That starts with a version of the F800GS’s tubular-steel frame with a beefed-up rear subframe, a tweak intended to accommodate the new, larger, under-seat tank. Where the standard F800GS carries 4.2 gallons, the Adventure hauls a more distance-worthy 6.3. BMW says range increases by 100 miles.

Covering this new tankage is reworked, “more masculine” bodywork unique to the Adventure model. A taller standard windscreen, revised saddle, true “enduro-style” footpegs, tubular engine guards, a pannier rack (that doubles as a tank guard, according to BMW) and other updates help put the most commonly added updates on the machine from the start. Turn the butch up to 11.

Beneath the Tarzan transformation lies a familiar motorcycle. The F800GS-A uses the 85-horsepower version of BMW’s 798cc parallel-twin engine with a chain/six-speed drivetrain. ABS is standard with ASC (traction control) and ESA (electronic suspension adjustments) as factory-installed options. Along with ASC is a new Enduro mode that raises intervention thresholds for both ABS and TC. (The F800 series does not have throttle-remapping ride modes, however.) BMW has not changed wheel sizes with the F800GS-A—it shares the base GS's 21-inch front/17-in. rear combo on spoke wheels—nor does the suspension have additional travel—it remains 9.1 in. front/8.5 in. rear. The reworked seat has increased seat height by 0.4 in., though. Thanks in part to the extra fuel capacity, claimed curb weight (fully fueled) is 505 pounds, up from 471 lbs.

BMW has not set retail prices for the F800GS Adventure, but the base F800GS runs $12,090 and the upcharge on the R1200GS line from GS to GS-A was around 16 percent. Our guess is that BMW will try to keep the price below $14K. And whatever you save from not buying the bigger twin, you can always spend on the raft of accessories that include a low seat, centerstand, comfort package (onboard computer, heated grips, centerstand), off-road-oriented tires, fog lights, alarm system, spoilers for the standard handguards and windscreen, a selection of aluminum side and top cases, and a new BMW Navigator Adventure GPS setup.

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