Spied: Triumph Daytona 250 | Up To Speed

New Quarter-Liter Sportbike Caught on Camera

By Ben Purvis, Photography by BMH Images

It's no secret that Triumph has been developing a new single-cylinder machine to target the booming Indian/Asian motorcycle market and also capture new riders in developed markets. We already showed you a spy shot of the naked single last month; now our spies have captured the first image of the fully faired sports model that will be the flagship of British maker's new lightweight line.

Following the pattern established with its 675cc triples, Triumph is developing both a naked "Street Single" and a faired "Daytona 250." Aside from bodywork and riding position, expect the two bikes to be identical under the plastic. Technically, both follow the layout of the bike Triumph sees as its main rival: Honda's CBR250R. That means a tubular-steel chassis with a simple, box-section swingarm and an all-new, DOHC, water-cooled, 250cc single for power. Expect between 25 and 30 hp, and a last-minute capacity hike to match Honda's recently announced CBR300R can't be ruled out either. Suspension will be simple and cheap—getting these bikes down to CBR250R cost parity will be vital to their success.

This project represents more than just another new model for Triumph; it represents the start of a plan that, if successful, will transform the firm. These new singles won't be built in Britain, or even in Triumph's facility in Thailand, but in a new factory in Karnataka, India, instead. Once fully online, Triumph expects to produce around 300,000 bikes per year at its Indian factory—six times the output of the company's current British and Thai factories combined. While the majority of that extra volume will go directly into the Indian market, the new singles are intended to appear in dealers all around the world, including America.

By Ben Purvis
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Beachmike
Sorry about that.

I like big motors but i do not want to own ne. I bought a klr 650 for the following attributes. About 40 rwh, about 430 labs. About high 13 low 14 sec quarter mile,will run on the freeway. Corners fine , handles rough roads fine, i can pick it up if i drop it or it falls in the parking lot, i can fix it , ( oh i would like fuel injection) tune it and plain not worry about it. My last bike had so many systems that while very nice it was a pita . ( yamaha1300 venture royal) a maintenance pig a gas hog(32 mpg) and weighted 800 + lbs. if it fell over i would have to leave it as a monument to excess.

Nice to see an embracement of change
Beachmike
Great concept. India has a long memory and there are a lot of old british bikes n the country. Royal Enfeild is ramping up production greatly and this bike should be a strong competitor. With production n india maybe Triumph will get he same import tax breaks for their big bikes HD got. It looks that with the lack of IP sharing india may take a large chunk of manufacturing from China and SE asia.

Now a world class 500 to 750 twin built at a lower cost point than the current twins, a set of variants  like Honda has rolled out and the competition in small to mid sized bike should benefit the consumer greatly.

I have been riding for 39 years and am looking forward to a choice in the light middleweight category. For too long bikes have just become bigger faster and far more expensive.
Beachmike
Great concept. India has a long memory and there are a lot of old british bikes n the country. Royal Enfeild is ramping up production greatly and this bike should be a strong competitor. With production n india maybe Triumph will get he same import tax breaks for their big bikes HD got. It looks that with the lack of IP sharing india may take a large chunk of manufacturing from China and SE asia.

Now a world class 500 to 750 twin built at a lower cost point than the current twins, a set of variants  like Honda has rolled out and the competition in small to mid sized bike should benefit the consumer greatly.

I have been riding for 39 years and am looking forward to a choice in the light middleweight category. For too long bikes have just become bigger faster and far more expensive.
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